Charlie Hunnam on ‘Papillon’, the Egregious Privatization of the Prison System, and ‘Children of Men’

Additional 2016 Comic Con Portraits

Charlie posed for Entertainment Weekly during the 2016 San Diego Comic Con last year while promoting King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. We only had a few photos from that particular portrait session and today I’m happy to share 8 more photos in high quality!

2017 Toronto International Film Festival Portraits

2017 Toronto International Film Festival Portraits

Charlie and the cast of Papillon posed for portraits while attending the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 7th & 8th. You can view the new portraits in our gallery now.




Update: Added even more new portraits to the gallery!

Charlie Reveals the Last Surprise He Gave His Girlfriend: ‘I Try to Keep Romance on the Reg’

Charlie Reveals the Last Surprise He Gave His Girlfriend: ‘I Try to Keep Romance on the Reg’

For Charlie Hunnam, it’s the little things that make for a happy relationship.

At the Toronto International Film Festival, where his new film Papillon is having its world premiere, the Sons of Anarchy star, 37, opened up about how he and his longterm girlfriend Morgana McNelis, 34, have kept their love strong for over a decade.

“I try to keep the romance on the reg,’” he told PEOPLE, Entertainment Weekly and InStyle at the festival on Friday. “I’ve been with my girlfriend 11 years, and as anyone knows, it’s been a long-term, fully monogamous relationship that requires work, a lot of work.”

And that work doesn’t always need to come in grand gestures. “Before I came away to TIFF I ended up staying until 5 in the morning because I decided I was going to clean the entire house.”

He also took care of “all the grocery shopping” and “all of the laundry,” chores Hunnam says are usually “stuff that we just share and both do all the time.”

“I thought it’d be nice for her to come home to everything immaculate and done,” Hunnam says.”I put flowers in the bedroom and in the kitchen, so she came home and was happy.”

For his new movie, Hunnam teams up with Mr. Robot’s Rami Malek to tackle roles originally played by Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman in the 1973 film of the same name. The film is an adaption of Henri Charrière’s memoir, which tells the story of his imprisonment and repeated escapes from the infamous prison colony of Devil’s Island.

Source: People.com

2017 Toronto International Film Festival: ‘Papillon’ Video Master Post

2017 Toronto International Film Festival: ‘Papillon’ Video Master Post

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2017 Toronto International Film Festival: ‘Papillon’ Review Round-Up

Check out various snippets below from a variety of reviews of Papillon after it’s debut at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival. Admittedly they don’t fair so well with some critics but still worth checking out.

Variety: In almost every respect, Danish director Michael Noer’s remake — which as “inspired by true events” credits equally real-life protagonist Henri Charrière’s memoirs and the earlier screenplay as sources — is a humbler enterprise, although still ambitious and impressive enough. New stars Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek are neither burdened nor burnished by already-iconic star status; this brisker telling is less pretentious if also less distinctive as large-scale filmmaking. In the end, what matters most is that the principally unchanged story of survival in colonial French Guiana remains a compelling one, no less when played as a relatively straightforward action-suspense saga rather than as a gargantuan allegory about the Indomitable Human Spirit.[…]

Nonetheless, Hunnam (though better in his other 2017 historical epic, “Lost City of Z”) is impressive, particularly during the physical deterioration of the long isolation setpiece. Malek is solid, but Dega could have used more slyness or some other distinguishing characteristic.

Hollywood Reporter: At best, Hunnam and Malek showcase their intense physical dedication, while generating a few chuckles amid all the hardship. They don’t really have the allure of McQueen and Hoffmann on screen — who ever could? — yet they’re an enjoyable combo in a movie that, despite a two-hour-plus running time, ultimately feels way more rushed than mastered (including a considerable amount of dubbing) and never recreates the harrowing experience of either the original or of the colonies in general. […]

The Film Stage: It seems like such a small alteration and yet it speaks volumes for Noer and Guzikowski as storytellers. They change who says certain lines, shift motivations, and oftentimes streamline ordeals that came across as overly convoluted in the original. Those endeavors that took multiple starts and stops to either succeed or fail in Schaffner’s version have all the bloat cut out so the emotion (elation or sorrow) can shine above this notion of “heroics.” This is the difference between a 1970s Hollywood vehicle starring Steve McQueen as a badass adonis and a 2017 cinematic landscape able to embrace nuance and compassion despite the testosterone flowing onscreen with a virtually all-male cast. Empathy without a gruff “I would kill you myself” is no longer taboo. It’s a sign of strength.[…]

Hunnam lends a welcome tinge of wry sarcastic humor to the performance—as he’s known to do—that endears him to us so he can be seen as more than a cliché.

Charlie Tells USA Today he knows ‘King Arthur’ went “horribly wrong”

Charlie Tells USA Today he knows ‘King Arthur’ went “horribly wrong”

You can dance around it, or you can be Charlie Hunnam and just come out and say it: His King Arthur movie this spring was not a win.

Hunnam doesn’t read reviews, but “I couldn’t be in the center of that thing and not be aware it was going horribly wrong,” the star says Friday, a day after debuting his new film, Papillon, at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Today he’s tucked into a corner of the Ritz-Carlton hotel, cap on, black bomber jacket zipped up to the neck. The candid 37-year-old says when it came to selling the Guy Ritchie film, “I was going to be a pro, and I was grateful for it and liked everyone that was involved. But I had some pretty big reservations about the end result. It didn’t reflect the movie that I thought we were making.”

The $175 million King Arthur carried hopes of becoming a franchise-starter, but stopped cold after earning a tepid $39 million at the box office.

After the dust settled, “I had a week when I wasn’t feeling very happy,” he admits. “I had allowed myself to get seduced by the scope of it and the potential upside of that financial scope for what I could then parlay into creatively (producing and writing). That was the bummer for me.”

Now Hunnam is back on his feet in Toronto with Papillon, a remake of the 1973 film which starred Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman. Hunnam lost over 40 pounds to take on McQueen’s role of a thief shipped off from France for a life sentence in a primitive prison camp in colonial French Guiana.

At the festival, Variety noted Papillon’s “somewhat self-conscious gravity has aged well.” Though less enthused, The Hollywood Reporter said Hunnam and co-star Rami Malek “prove to be an entertaining duo” playing begrudging inmates who begrudgingly bond behind bars.

The Brit, who ate next to nothing for Lost City of Z prior to shooting Papillon, put himself into solitary confinement for eight days during the shooting without food or water. (The real Henri Charriere, the real-life subject of the tale, was in solitary confinement in the South American camp for two years.)

Hunnam hopes the historical tale of inhumane treatment opens dialogue about the state of the current American prison system.

Inside the modern prison system, “it is exactly the same, really, in conditions and everything,” he says. “I’ve spent a lot of time visiting prisons in the U.S. and it is shocking.”

What will Hunnam do next? Three weeks ago, his Netflix film Triple Frontier fell apart after Ben Affleck pulled out to focus on his wellness and family, followed by other contenders including Mark Wahlberg, Mahershala Ali and Chadwick Boseman. So he’s taking six months off.

“I’m going to hang with my girl, I’m going to write the two screenplays I want to write,” says Hunnam. “I’m going to do some therapy, think a lot about the future and just recalibrate.”

Right now, he’s writing madly, “six days a week, usually 15 hours a day,” he says. “I write like it’s my obsession and I’m so happy.”

The former Sons of Anarchy star might even forgo acting in the future.

“I don’t know if I feel like I’ve got the chops to get to the destination of putting in Daniel Day-Lewis-caliber performances. Maybe. Maybe not,” says Hunnam. “But I’m certainly a long way from it. And I don’t enjoy the process. I (expletive) love writing. Maybe I’ll just become a writer-producer. I’m really, really seriously considering that.”

Source: usatoday.com

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